Paintings By Claude Monet

Paintings by Claude Monet could shed some light on London fog

Paintings by Monet depicting Gothic buildings were based on real observations of London and not born from his imagination in the Studio in Giverny, in France, according to the authors of a study conducted at the University of Birmingham.

Claude Monet. “London. Parliament. The sun in the fog”

Paintings by Monet depicting Gothic buildings were based on real observations of London and not born from his imagination in the Studio in Giverny, in France, according to the authors of a study conducted at the University of Birmingham, writes newspaper the Daily Telegraph. Analysis of his paintings, letters and architectural drawings, the results of which were published in the journal Royal Society Proceedings A, has allowed scientists to pinpoint the location of the artist on the covered terrace of the former Governor’s hall of the hospital of St. Thomas, located on the second floor. The building has not survived, but today, the same views can be enjoyed from the South-West corner of Westminster bridge.

The contour of the Parliament against the sky gave the researchers the guidelines to determine the position of the sun. Were then produced by calculating solar geometry to identify the date and time of the creation of landscapes with accuracy to the minute. In the end – “excellent match” with information from Monet’s letters in which he grumbles about London’s “sad and colorless” weather. “It causes me such suffering!” he wrote.

One of the authors of the study, John Thorns said: “Monet’s Paintings contain accurate quantitative information supporting the hypothesis that its purpose was as faithfully as possible to capture the visual effects that he saw when he painted in London.”

Monet was famous for the fact that they worked quickly, and, according to scientists, the creation of each painting of the London series he could take only two hours. As a result of brownish and yellowish sky gives snapshots, which are “an indicator of smog conditions and atmosphere of the Victorian era depicted in them,” writes Thorns together with Jacob Baker, suggesting that they can give meteorologists information on the climate and air pollution.

“Monet’s series is probably the best color chronicle of Victorian fogs, – said the scientists. – Color potentially gives information on transmitted and scattered light passing through the atmosphere, which, in turn, gives information about the chemical composition of fog”. Light absorption by grease and oil droplets from Smoking pipes may be connected with the yellow and brown coloration of some fog, while blue and red might arise because of the action of nanoparticles, which scatter light.

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